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FutureNow Post
Monday, Mar. 19, 2007 at 4:51 am

Why Does Every B2B Lead Site Want me to Submit?

By Bryan Eisenberg
March 19th, 2007

Submit (v) – 1. refer for judgment or consideration 2. yield to the control of another 3. submit or yield to another’s wish or opinion

When your prospects have filled out your form and are all excited about getting in touch with you, what message do you want to send as they get ready to click the button and send you their contact information?

I visited one website where I noticed five B2B advertisers. I checked each of their forms and snagged their send buttons. Here they are in no particular order:
1. cta_lead_form1.jpg

2. cta_lead_form_2.jpg

3. cta_lead_form_3.jpg

4. cta_lead_form_4.jpg

5. cta_lead_form_5.jpg

Which one would you prefer to click?

PS. Would this one tempt you?
cta6.jpg

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Comments (19)

  1. Gee Bryan, even your Blog asks me to “Submit Comment”.

    I do think the language in your alternative is more pleasent (and am inclined to change our “submit” button), but is it scalable to the rest of a site’s action items? Does “Click to Subscribe” become “Please Subscribe Me to Your Newsletter”?

    One suggestion: if the visitor’s privacy is important (as it states near your “click to subscribe” button), have that statement link to the formal privacy policy (instead of having a link in the smallest font size far far away in the footer).

  2. David, Our own button is changing.You know about the cobblers kids and all. The best calls to action remind people what they get for clicking.

  3. David:

    This is a great post! It’s a reminder that seemingly small things, such as the words on the button, may have a big impact.

    You ask why “submit” is so common. Here’s one possible answer: all of the off-the-shelf form templates or third-party ASP’s include this phrase. My experience is that sometimes it can be changed but in other cases the third-party ASP services have not considered that anyone might want to use a different phrase.

    Once again, you have made an important point.

  4. David

    We have done extensive testing of link and unlinking the we value your privacy and have found the subscriber conversion rates go up when it is not linked.

  5. [...] Why Does Every B2B Lead Site Want me to Submit? by Bryan Eisenberg at grokdotcom. [...]

  6. [...] Call to Action 1) Is your call to action distinctive? Does it stand out on the page? 2) Button Language or hyperlink anchor text 3) B2B Concerns – Are you asking leads to submit? 4) Button Colors & Shapes [...]

  7. [...] They could have done a quick search to gray out the submit button. Once they're done with this, you can talk to them about using the word 'submit' on the button. [...]

  8. David

    I too am a strong believer of having an alternative clause that indicates what the visitor is getting, instead of the standard submit button.

    Your comment about the subscription rate going up when the privacy clause is not linked is a revelation. Thanks! Probably the visitor gets sidetracked when he/she clicks the privacy link. Did you have the link open a JavaScript window stating the policy (I recommend this) or you linked to your normal privacy page (strict no-no)?

  9. Bryan,

    Pass me my whip and assume the position.

  10. That is a good point as I have wondered the same in the past. I did test it out and found it had no noticeable effect on leads gathered.

  11. [...] Are you sure there's a sub-topic? I haven't selected anything. (Submit may not be the best choice, either.) Regardless, this drop-down menu tells MySpace visitors that [...]

  12. And what’s wrong with a plain “Submit”?

  13. I think submit is easily recognizable, that is why it is used so often.

  14. Interesting. Bryan – have you guys done any A/B or multivariate testing using ‘submit’ versus another call to action?

    The trouble I find with longer calls to actions on buttons, is that they can often get ‘lost’ because of too much text. And they stretch the background image if you don’t use a custom image, therefore look plain ugly and blurry, like this:
    http://www.designdetector.com/bugs/ie6-stretched-button-bug.html

    Also, submit has become so common because of ‘web expectations’. Submit was always the default value for submit buttons, and I guess the web world has gained accustumed to seeing it that way, much like they always see a logo in the top left.

    Interesting perspective though.

    Rich Page

  15. Rich,

    We have tested this many many times. Most often you want it as a graphic so that you can control the font, etc.

    Bryan

  16. Our blog subscribe button says:

    “Your ideas intrigue me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter”

    Brownie points to anyone who knows where that’s from.

  17. Хотите раскрутить свой сайт – продвижение сайта.Контекстная реклама, размещение: реклама сайта.

  18. Gee Bryan, even your Blog asks me to “Submit Comment”.

    I do think the language in your alternative is more pleasent (and am inclined to change our “submit” button), but is it scalable to the rest of a site’s action items? Does “Click to Subscribe” become “Please Subscribe Me to Your Newsletter”?

    One suggestion: if the visitor’s privacy is important (as it states near your “click to subscribe” button), have that statement link to the formal privacy policy (instead of having a link in the smallest font size far far away in the footer)

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Bryan Eisenberg, founder of FutureNow, is a professional marketing speaker and the co-author of New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestselling books Call to Action and Waiting For Your Cat to Bark and Always Be Testing. You can friend him on Facebook or Twitter.

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