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Wednesday, May. 2, 2007 at 12:13 pm

When A Product Sells Itself

By Robert Gorell
May 2nd, 2007

There’s no need to call out the blue pill in question by name. If it worked for Bob Dole and Hef, surely a bit of competition won’t kill it’s, er, position in the marketplace.

Well, that was drug company Pfizer’s stance before, uh… performance started slipping.

Catching up with the times, said pill is now busy surprising broca with a new ad campaign that’s mostly in gibberish. The New York Times has the scoop:

Pfizer, the world’s largest drug company, offers an answer in a new campaign for Viagra, so far shown only in Canada. The ads feature middle-aged men and women talking in a made-up language, save for one word.

“Viagra spanglecheff?” says a man to a friend at a bowling alley.

“Spanglecheff?” his friend asks.

“Minky Viagra noni noni boo-boo plats!” the first man replies, with a grin that suggests he is not talking about the drug’s side effects. The ads end with the slogan, “The International Language of Viagra.”

Okay, so not every brand can get away with this. But what’s interesting here is that the ad–and you don’t even need to see it to see it–speaks directly to its audience without asking the rest of us to hear, say, Bob Dole sing its praises. This strategy has the added benefit of saying “it’s not a big deal” without saying anything at all.

Funny how they can take copy that seems lifted from a sp@m email about their product, put it in a new context, and poof… instant re-branding!

Just goes to show, you’ve always got a first chance to make a second impression.

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