Questions? (877) 643-7244
FutureNow Article
Thursday, Apr. 10, 2008

Bold Trust-Building Ideas from Mint.com

By Robert Gorell
April 10th, 2008

fresh copywriting techniquesAs tax time looms in the U.S., personal finance management weighs heavy on the minds of those of us who would rather put it off until next year.

A few of my colleagues, two of whom had actually used it, recommended Mint.com. I had been to the site a few times in December when I first heard about it. Back then, I wasn’t yet thinking about signing up, but I did recall Mint.com being extremely good-looking and well-written.

Months later — and this is rarely the case for someone with my attention span — I still knew the site’s unique value proposition: Mint is a free, online personal money management tool that can access bank accounts and credit card records without compromising security. (Oh, and it can help you get better rates on a credit card, which I don’t much care about since I’ve sworn not to use them ever since getting in debt when I was in college. But I digress.)

All of that was clear from the homepage.

But what really impressed me when returning to the site was the “features” page. Right away, I saw this:

Mint does NOT store your usernames, passwords or account numbers. Mint partners with Yodlee, the leading provider of online banking services to major banks for more than 10 years, to ensure a secure connection to your personal financial information.

Mint protects your information using bank–level data security and 128 bit-encryption, verified by Verisign and HackerSafe.

Mint is TRUSTe certified to provide industry–leading privacy protection and partners with RSA to provide anti-phishing protection.

Using Mint does NOT require any personally identifying information, leaving you as anonymous as you would like to be.

Instead of diving into what I presumed would be a sales pitch on technical features — boom — they addressed my (significant) privacy concerns. Then they went into the sales pitch. Very smart.

But consider how the same copy reads with some minor text and formatting changes:

Mint does not store your account numbers, usernames or passwords. Mint partners with Yodlee, the leading provider of online banking services to major banks for more than 10 years, to ensure a secure connection to your personal financial information.

Mint protects your information using bank–level data security and 128 bit-encryption, verified by Verisign and HackerSafe.

Mint is TRUSTe certified to provide industry–leading privacy protection and partners with RSA to provide anti-phishing protection.

Using Mint does not require any personally identifying information, so you remain totally and completely anonymous.

Which version do you find more persuasive? I’d be interested to hear your comments.

In the meantime, I’m going to create a Mint.com account. If it works as well as the site looks, and if it can get me to manage my money better, I’ll be thrilled. My only real concern — the only thing I didn’t see addressed on the website — is whether the credit card companies are going to spam me with “Limited Time Introductory Rate!” emails. (Mint is, after all, an affiliate site. They’ve got to make money somehow.)

. .

This Just In: FutureNow’s Persuasive Online Copywriting seminar returns to New York City on June 2nd.

Add Your Comments

Comments (8)

  1. I wrote an article comparing Mint.com to Geezeo.com and Wesabe.com awhile back. Mint was definitely my favorite for its simple (and user-friendly) interface. The other sites had some cool social media capabilities added on, but Mint runs smoothly and generates the clearest graphs and charts to show you where your money is going. And no, I did not spammed with bank and credit card emails. The offers are there when you pull up your account, but they’re easy to bypass if you’re not interested.

  2. I think the first one is more persuasive.

  3. I think the second one is better because the most important words stand out and seem unmistakable. And thanks for bringing this to my attention. I’m going to check it out, too!

  4. The second one! It focuses on what it does and how it solves my concerns (as the average user) rather than how it does it. I find all those caps in the first one are confusing and distract me from the point .. that it keeps my stuff safe.
    By the way, great stuff. thanks.

  5. Personally, I favor the first version. There are key words highlighted that lead the eye, but not still cause me to stop and read the entire text. For example, the ‘not’ in the last sentence – if I’m scanning, all I see is the not, which for me, causes me to continue reading to figure out what the ‘not’ is referring too.

    The second version does not work that way, I read the bold text and thats it. I’m left with out a complete understanding of what was said because I read ONLY the bold text.

  6. The second one is better if the person reading is a scanner of text like me. You can get the essence of how secure their site is without having to read the whole thing.

  7. So you’re saying that Mint.com is worth to be trusted? I don’t know how to say it but a friend of mine had a bad experience with them and I don’t really recommend it.

  8. clearest graphs You can get the essence of how those caps in the first smoothly and generates the one are confusing and charts to show you where your money distract me from the point and

Add Your Comments

 

Print this Article
Share

More articles from Robert Gorell

Marketing Optimization Blog
FREE Newsletter Sign-Up
send it once every: