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Monday, Dec. 22, 2008 at 10:32 am

Did Twitter Cost A Sale?

By Bryan Eisenberg
December 22nd, 2008

My friend Brian was checking out Dropbox on a tip from John Jantsch and they were feeding a Twitter search live feed onto their landing page. It is good in theory. The theory being that you create a bandwagon effect but check out what was said on the first live feed on the left:

“CaptainCowPie: Wow Evernote allows files to be stored and synched across computers and my iPhone. This may replace my Dropbox completely.”

Ouch! Talk about hijacking the conversation. Reminds Brian and me of the classic adword targeting issues. Do you think that tactic helped or hurt their chance at this sale?

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Comments (13)

  1. Def. not off to a good start. Social media can really impact a company the wrong way if not approached correctly.

  2. You know, it’s hard to know the total impact in one isolated incident, but I would suggest over the long haul this kind of transparency pays dividends. In this case it’s more likely that good is being conversed.

  3. Ouch. That would be a conversion killer for me. I don’t care how transparent a company is if there’s a strong reason to choose a competitor – coming out of a real user’s mouth, on the product page, nonetheless!

  4. Hopefully, that comment fell off the home page quickly as Dropbox is mentioned a decent amount. We might be helping its sales by talking about its potential loss of sales.

  5. This is the type of challenge commonly experienced by perople running forums or blogs … hi-jacking of conversations by third parties!

  6. You have to decide whether you’re running a business or a forum. At this point, social media would be a distraction on the website, and on my time.

  7. On/Off topic, but that dropbox site is pretty darn cool. Been looking for something like that for some time.

  8. [...] (every mention of their brand) right onto product pages like Ask & Answer tools – however, this can be a risky move. Another option is showing your own corporate account’s tweets on your site, like [...]

  9. [...] mention of their brand) right onto product pages like Ask & Answer tools – however, this can be a risky move. Another option is showing your own corporate account’s tweets on your site, like [...]

  10. [...] (every mention of their brand) right onto product pages like Ask & Answer tools – however, this can be a risky move. Another option is showing your own corporate account’s tweets on your site, like [...]

  11. [...] mention of their brand) right onto product pages like Ask & Answer tools – however, this can be a risky move. Another option is showing your own corporate account’s tweets on your site, like [...]

  12. On/Off topic, but that dropbox site is pretty darn cool. Been looking for something like that for some time. [Computers & Office]

  13. You know, it’s hard to know the total impact in one isolated incident, but I would suggest over the long haul this kind of transparency pays dividends. In this case it’s more likely that good is being conversed.

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Bryan Eisenberg, founder of FutureNow, is a professional marketing speaker and the co-author of New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestselling books Call to Action and Waiting For Your Cat to Bark and Always Be Testing. You can friend him on Facebook or Twitter.

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