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Monday, Jun. 21, 2010 at 10:02 am

Surprise Your Way to an Optimized Conversion Rate

By Brendan Regan
June 21st, 2010

Surprise is the foundation of delight and the beginning of persuasion.

–Roy Williams, the Wizard of Ads

1smilies.001Today’s post is about how the element of surprise can be leveraged to optimize the conversion rate of your marketing efforts. We’ve written about the science of surprise before, but today we are going to talk about the best areas of your website to focus on testing this approach.  The Web is too often a place of “me-too” marketing tactics and “late entrant” companies who pummel the public with un-differentiated propositions.  However, this can be advantageous for those marketers who use a bit of surprise to delight their prospects and customers and truly differentiate their offering.

Let’s start with some general areas of your website (and landing pages) that are great places to experiment with ways to surprise and delight your prospects.  We’ll cite some simple examples from each category to get you thinking about how to apply them to your unique website.

Note: “surprise” is very different from “shock,” don’t you agree?  We are purposely focusing on surprise in the sense of a delightful surprise, not a startling and unpleasant shock.  A free shipping upgrade offered by the folks at Zappos is a “surprise.”  Getting an error during an online checkout process is an unpleasant “shock.”

Areas Where You Should Experiment with “Surprise”

Images - How often do you see “stock” photographs used on websites?  Every day.  How often do you see bright, polished models posing as customer service agents?  Too often.  Using real photos of real people may surprise and tickle your prospects in a major way.  And you might gain some “credibility points” in the process!

Video – B2B promotional videos are often guilty of being over-produced, expensive, flashy, etc.  Wake up, marketers!  The YouTube revolution was not televised, and the public is obviously accepting of low-budget videos so long as the content is compelling.  You may be able to surprise your prospects with a simple, inexpensive, yet genuine video instead of trying to win that Webby Award.

Copy – We’ve all read B2B “brochure” copy that’s been ported to a website, and it’s boring.  We tune it out.  We’ve also all read the product description that comes straight from the manufacturer (after it is watered down by the Legal Department).  It’s boring!  We tune it out.  Test surprising your prospects with gutsy copy that is filled with passion.  Write product descriptions that appeal to all the senses and help the prospect imagine what owning the product will feel like.

Guarantees – “30-Day Money Back Guarantee”?  Yawn.  Legalese disclaimers about all the ways you can weasel out of fulfilling your guarantee?  Now I’m getting jaded!  Test surprising your prospects with a 46 and 1/2 day guarantee just to wake them up.  Write your guarantee in plain English and back it up with the passion that caused you to start your business in the first place.  Also, don’t forget that we warned you about “copycat credibility.”

Areas Where You Should NOT Experiment with Surprise

We’ve given you four areas of your website that are ripe for testing the element of surprise and delight.  However, it essential to keep in mind that there are areas of your website where your attempts to surprise could end up as nasty shocks instead.

Navigation – Global navigation tabs go at the top.  Links take you to new pages.  Breadcrumb navigation shows where you are in the site’s “map.”  There may be a few odd scenarios where surprising your audience with non-intuitive navigation is effective, but your site is probably not one of those cases.  Handle with care.

User Experience – The design patterns that develop over time and set our expectations about “how websites are supposed to work” shouldn’t be turned upside down in an attempt to surprise.  Buttons need to behave like other buttons, search results need to be laid out a certain way, and browsing products needs to be similar to how the majority of sites are.  Don’t surprise me with a site experience that is contrary to my expectations–that’s shock.

Forms – Web forms are too crucial to your business to try and be cute or novel with their design.  Follow the best practices, experiment cautiously, and save the creative surprises for Images, Video, Copy, and Guarantees.

Add Your Comments

Comments (128)

  1. Amen to that! This article was refreshing and speaks to the user experience. After a while your eyes glaze over the redundancy of guarantees, images and copy so often that you simply don’t bother with them because you already know what to expect.

    In such a mercurial world, it’s true that sites that are just as exciting would be the ones on top. I’d love to hear from someone who’s tried these suggestions and what the impact of these changes were.

  2. I think the average surfer have view so many different websites that they probably have become desensitized to the content and surprises already. Its really hard to come out with a refreshing surprise these days.

  3. [...] Surprise Your Way to an Optimized Conversion Rate Published: June 21, 2010 Source: Conversion Rate Optimization & Marketing Blog | FutureNow, Inc Surprise is the foundation of delight and the beginning of persuasion. [...]

  4. Thanks for these really great tips. I think people love surprises and it’s nice to be able to surprise your readers or customers once in a while to liven the internet life up a bit. I really like the areas you’ve suggested where we can add in a little bit of surprise. I think I’ll try the pictures and maybe tweak the guarantees in the future.

  5. [...] View full post on Conversion Rate Optimization & Marketing Blog | FutureNow, Inc [...]

  6. Internet users get bored very easily. If it’s the same stuff appearing all the time there’s no element of surprise. So I agree doing something different is cool. I talked to a company recently that was doing a webinar. Instead of the usual boring stuff they did a video webinar of a group of people sitting around the table having breakfast. Cool idea and it really worked!

  7. Those are all good Ideas but it seems like I just might not have enough time in the day to do the extra work…. Thats probably why people are surprised when they come across someone that does.

  8. Good post. It’s the n400 effect. n400 is a response that occurs about 400 milliseconds after an out of the ordinary comment registers. If someone says “I walked the tree” then our brains are going to trigger the response 400 milliseconds after. If you apply this concept to visual advertising then you are going to catch the attention of a lot more people!

  9. On one of my first sites I ever marketed, I tested the 30-day, 60-day and lifetime guarantee on an ebook I was selling. The lifetime one beat the other two hands down. And not only that but I sold over 2000 copies and never had to make a refund.

    I guess if you stand by your product, you can go out on a limb with the surprise elements on your copy.

  10. @Mercado

    It’s interesting regarding your ebook story. However, I know from marketing class that most people don’t want to go through the hassles of taking advantage of “guarantees” or “warranties”, especially on cheap items. It’s not surprising that you never had anyone ask for a refund.

  11. So basically what you are trying to say is that make your site fresh and interesting. Good advise:)

  12. Old principle but new application of such a principle. It boils down to being the “purple cow”, to use a Seth Godin coined term.

  13. I would say that optimising your entire marketing campaign for a better RoI is the key concerns every online marketer has in mind. It should be kept in mind that all online marketing efforts should be capitalised to make your online campaign work better including your PPC< SEO, Email, Affiliates Marketing, CPC and AdNetworks

  14. I like what you have to say about this topic. One thing I noticed in your post is that all of the surprises you mention were because they were real/authentic versus how most companies represent themselves.

    I think this is a great point, that you don’t have to dress up your product or service if it adds real value. Thank you.

  15. some great tips, what about the call to action button, does that come under content?

  16. @onlinemarketingblog: CTAs are an interesting topic. I would categorize them under “User Experience” and NOT try to surprise prospects with quirky CTAs. You could always experiment with care, I suppose.

  17. I had to laugh about the link about stock photos cause I have to admit I am guilty of nearly all of them. I think I have the handshake on all of my sites :D

    Really enjoyed reading this and had to laugh a view times cause I thought I was smart using those tactics

    ~ Alex

  18. I think people with websites should surprise their audience with some personality! I am tired to going to “clean,” “elegant,” sites where you can’t tell one gray and white from the next… think the logo will sell the brand? Have a little personality, that would be a surprise.

  19. I’ve been using this surprise tactic for a couple of months on one of my businesses, and it’s doing well. Really, really well.

    Basically I just send my buyers a small gift – along with a small note telling them to buy again! – exactly one week after they bought from me.

    Haha.

  20. Interesting :)
    I like the part when you say that shock is different. We don’t want to shock people with flashing ads and popups :D
    Also important things is not to suprise with navigation (as you said). This may lead to high bounce rate.

  21. You are absolutely right in terms of the video, i mean for literally an hour of your time you could benefit for a lifetime.

    Also make your forms as simple as possible with an element of design to match the overall website, it always helps.

  22. That seems to make a lot of sense. In my opinion, that’s also a reason why individual internet marketers working from home with low budgets have really a possibility to outbeat their big competitors.

    Marketing is first and foremost a way to communicate something to people in a compelling way. It isn’t a matter of expensive designs or features.

  23. Basically what you’re saying is be real, be genuine. I totally agree. Although, real photography can be expensive.

  24. [...] View full post on Conversion Rate Optimization & Marketing Blog | FutureNow, Inc [...]

  25. [...] –Roy Williams, the Wizard of Ads Today’s post is about how the element of surprise can be leveraged to optimize the conversion rate of your marketing efforts. We’ve written about the science of surprise before, but today we are going … Conversion Rate Optimization & Marketing Blog | FutureNow, Inc [...]

  26. It is harder and harder to give that element of surprise because of skeptical consumer. Present them with a free offer or discount and sometimes they think it is a scam or too good to be true. Therefore, be aware of that skepticism and offer something that looks real enough to be believed.

  27. This is great. I think it’s essential to keep in mind that internet marketing is always changing and we always need to look for new and fresh techniques to keep conversions steady.

  28. I think that there are some good points here, especially the ones about how “not to surprise”.

    Surprise is a key element to hold your product or service apart from it’s competitors, however, it needs to be used very smartly in order to maintain its effectiveness.

    Keep up the good work!!! :)

  29. Very informative post, I love the surprise when it comes to image. So it is compelling to use your own images rather than beautiful models? Is that what you are saying? Lol! What if you don’t have the looks? Do you still consider doing it? Maybe they will surely be surprise.

  30. If you apply this concept to visual advertising then you are going to catch the attention of a lot more people!

  31. excellent post it really needs to be something different that you offer in your website now because there are millions of websites in each niche so only the ones that stand out will succeed. Thanks for the advice, im going to add in some video into my blog to make it attractive and stand out a bit more to bring in a larger audience.
    Nice Blog :)

  32. There is definitely some good straightforward advice in this article which is often overlooked by people.

  33. @jason
    people defiantly overlook this sort of good advice.

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  35. Interesting.some great tips, what about the call to action button

  36. Good post with good advice. Be yourself but be different ..nearly always works.

  37. I have been trying the same tips, but i could nt succeed bcoz i was not sticked with that ..other wise these methods really work :)

  38. Completely agree with what you just said. Fresh content is essential, but its presentation is more important, because we need people to read the stuff and promote it on social networks and share it with others. So no matter how good the content is, if its not presented good then people simply won’t read it.

  39. I especially like your idea about not using Stock Photos but I can also easily see how time consuming it would be to take your own pictures in order to make them unique. Any suggestions on how to do that?

  40. Ha, it’s funny you mention the stock images. The past couple days I’ve seen the same image on like 4 different sites. It’s pretty ridiculous.

  41. i totally agree with u…..

    Its a fresh content…..

    Thanks for sharing…..

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  43. The idea behind this blog post is sound, although the actual advice leaves a bit to be desired. 46.5 day guarantee? Honestly, I doubt that most people look at that.

  44. I love to play with gurantees! Works best for almost every service. Guranteed! ;)

  45. Good points, of course you need to differentiate your self from your competitors, in order to stay ahead in the competitive environment. It’s a good idea to give the visitors a few ‘surprises’ which could leave a positive impression on the visitors and ultimately increase conversion rate . But definitely not shocks!!!

  46. nothing puts me off more than stock imagery and cheesy call to actions. although i agree that you should include certain surprises, standard practice never goes amiss! :)

  47. One thing I would suggest for Areo to experiment is the Sound. With a Radio, someone can follow easily a post without staying front of the screen. This is an excellent option for keeping new customers…. ;)

  48. I think I got more out of this article than in the 6 months of Marketing I did at TAFE. Cheers on the post.

  49. Great text, thanks. From my experience with each site we create we try to add something unique and a little different, experiment a little and effects are positive. You just need to beat competition somehow….

  50. Completely agree with what you just said. Fresh content is essential, but its presentation is more important, because we need people to read the stuff and promote it on social networks and share it with others. So no matter how good the content is, if its not presented good then people simply won’t read it.

  51. The article is quite useful, especially the part about the difference between shock and surprise. I had a hard time explaining to a client that he is shocking and scaring the customer too much, which was hurting conversions.

    Surprise (in a good way) works!

  52. people are surprised when they come across someone that does, they should know about difference between shock and surprise, impression in visitor could make you more impressive to express your feel

  53. Its essential to keep in mind that there are areas of your website where your attempts to surprise could end up as nasty shocks instead.

  54. Interesting approach, I would like to see some data on this if you carried it out. Although I do not agree with some points such as using your own photos simply due to the time involved in taking them

  55. Those are some excellent selections of various different ways to create the element of surprise for a company’s website, but I also want to give you props for your explanation on how to maintain the proper functionality of the website as well. Navigation I think is one of the biggest problems that I find with most websites. Either they’re unorganized or they’re difficult to click. Sometimes if someone makes their website too fancy on a program like Flash it takes too long to load or there are several errors. It’s important that if you want your website to give a good impression, the Navigation should be as short and simple as possible.

  56. Surprising your customers by giving them something valuable they didn’t expect can be very powerful. I guess the old cliche under promise and over deliver is still valid. Very good article, thank you.

  57. Very good ideas and ways to create surprise, I am going to have to try them out on my own websites so that I can get more repeat customers. The only thing is that I don’t just want one-time buyers from that surprise and their only buys based on those surprise.

  58. We try to surprise our customers with the level of service they receive but this is focussed on aftersales. Now need to convert this to pre-sale. Thanks for the great ideas.

  59. I think people with websites should surprise their audience with some personality! I am tired to going to “clean,” “elegant,” sites where you can’t tell one gray and white from the next… think the logo will sell the brand? Have a little personality, that would be a surprise.

  60. I like the video idea. I have worked hard to make my videos as professional as possible, which sets me apart from many of my competitors. But I get that the “homegrown” feel of a less polished approach may have a more beneficial result.

  61. The idea about the 46 1/2 day guarantee is interesting! I’m really a big proponent of testing little ideas like this, I’ll give that a go at some point (got some other stuff to test first…), and get back to you with the results.

    The whole concept of surprise is key though – when we see things that we’ve seen before, our brains just switch off. Good stuff.

  62. Nothing that surprising in there really, simple A/B testing combined with a good user experience.

    This should be a formality on any well designed/developed website.

    Regards

    Rob

  63. While the first part is good advice I couldn’t agree less when it comes to the second part ‘Areas Where You Should NOT Experiment with Surprise’, if every one of us would stick to the patterns today’s IT would be no different than the ’90s desktops and generally when it comes to evolution we would be stuck in the stone age, every area can be improved and this can only be achieved by experimenting something different as opposed to following the patterns.

  64. Great points. I especially liked how overall your talking about being personal and not a nobody. The best way for people to trust you on the web is to get personal and show that your a real person. This goes with email marketing as well. Don’t send out emails with webmaster in the email and say we got a coupon. get personal and connect and conversions will be higher!

  65. What about buttons copy? what if you change your market standard copy to a new one, different, maybe more direct?

  66. Brilliant post! It really refreshes my mind and sight when looking on websites. It will greatly help me in designing my future website. I am currently a marketer and nowadays knowledge about online and web marketing is important especially when your target consumers are diverse and can be located in all parts of the world. The power of the Internet is important and your idea of having an experiment of surprise on images, videos, copy and guarantees will surely attract customers’ eyes.

    A customer searching on the net could surely find many websites and therefore having a spice of surprise in those selected areas would surely be a hit to customers.

  67. Very true to be a little surprising at times. Try to tweak as many of the standard promos and offerings that every other company is using.

    if you are offering a discount, make it a n off number that will make customers wonder what is going on.

    We all read so much stuff online all day and if it is all the same, we just glaze over.

  68. Surprises! A motivation to wake up from long sleep, a trigger to make any fresh idea, but the point is hardwork.

  69. Well don’t you think people are using some standard things like “30 days guarantee” because this is what strikes best?

    Like the colors of your adsense and stuff. Some just generate more clicks than others.

    I’d say be cautious trying out new stuff like this.

  70. If you follow the path, everybody follows, you are gonna get where everyone is going.

    This is why there r so few famous bloggers,sites (and people in general)

    If you want to achieve something great look for uniqueness.

  71. Well, looks like I’ve got to try this strategy. Surprising your customers in the right way is effective. Customers always want something new to their senses.

  72. Very true to be a little surprising at times. Try to tweak as many of the standard promos and offerings that every other company is using.

    if you are offering a discount, make it a n off number that will make customers wonder what is going on.

    We all read so much stuff online all day and if it is all the same, we just glaze over.

  73. Amen on the navigation, never ever try and be cute with the was a site navigates itself, it can be a death sentence. There’s a reason people don’t live in labyrinths they don’t like to be lost. Confusing navigation is unacceptable, whether it be moving, hidden, or just unorganized.

  74. I created a site called the theredneckrealtor.com to surprise people and get some laughs and the point was I thought people would find it funny and link to it- and if it got a high page rank it could help my real site – but some of the local agents found it and now are using it against me any suggestions or should I follow through with it take a look.

  75. Great article. I love using “surprise” to grab their attention, and also causes the concept to STICK intheir minds.

    I love watching the Aha moment occur. When they discovered something they didn’t know, lights go on.

  76. I agree that surprise is a key element to hold your product or service apart from it’s competitors. It needs to be used very smartly in order to maintain its success.
    You must perform extensive A/B testing and see is what you think work well with your customers. The thinks you can change are so many; better to do it with caution.

  77. I agree that surprise can be a good thing, but if you’re not careful you could end up scaring potential customers away! I think there can be a fine line between intriguing new customers and making then run away in horror. As you say, some things (e.g. forms and navigation bars) should be kept simple and user-friendly.

  78. Surprise can work with some people but to other wont. This is because some people are not comfortable with new and different stuff and might get scared.

  79. @multiple commenters: Good points about how some prospects might react negatively to surprise. In Myers-Briggs personality talk, it’s the “Methodical” persona who you have to be careful with. They don’t like surprises because of their strong, logical frame of reference. Which is why we test :)

  80. In my personal experience I have found that surprise imagery and ‘hook’ phrases are no longer credible. Markets currently employing this strategy are weight reduction, muscle building and credit recovery sites. While they attract my attention, I immediately associate them with spam and hazard and ignore them.

  81. I agree with the Experimental part of it, When ever I schedule a meeting I make it for 3:05 or 10:35 that five minute difference actually makes people remember the time and get to the meeting on time

  82. Yes, using real photos of real people sounds great in theory, but the problem of attaining a signed model release arises. For commercial sites you need to be cognizant of this.

  83. Another area where you should not rely on “surprise” to improve your ROI is translation. Though the low quality of free atomated translation might make your visitor smile, it is unlikely to impress him/her positively about the quality of the product/service you are advertising.

  84. I absolutely agree with what Billund Car Hire said earlier: “Nothing puts me off more than stock imagery and cheesy call to actions”. I think that this blog shows some great alternatives to add more to your site and to get out of the “cheesy” clichés that everyone is so used to when it comes to marketing websites.

  85. This really opened my eyes to the notion of surprise. The point about stock photos and videos really resonated with me. I am very guilty of this and am going to start testing more genuine images. Thanks.

  86. Surprise can work with some people but to other wont. This is because some people are not comfortable with new and different stuff and might get scared.

  87. You are right in terms of the video, i mean for literally an hour of your time you could benefit for a lifetime.

    Also make your forms as simple as possible with an element of design to match the overall website, it always helps.

  88. Yes, yes, yes! I LOVE when websites do this, and continue to delight me when my order arrives. I ordered from a store with a very fun interface (wallcandyarts), and they sent me a little blue toy dinosaur with my package. On the packing slip, along with my ordered items, it said 1 – Rarrrrr! I was like, what’s a rarrr? And then I found the dinosaur and had a great laugh. It really made me like the company!

  89. Hear hear!! Your article really touches on the often overlooked aspect of surprise. I completely agree with you about the stock photos – I have run across duplicate photos on completely different sites and as soon as I realized this was the case I was completely turned off. Thanks for the informative post.

  90. So basically what you are trying to say is that make your site fresh and interesting. Good advise:)

  91. Extremely good article, Brendan.

    An advertisement must not lead with something that we already know, but must surprise with something we don’t.

    Maybe a new approach that we’ve not thought of before that would result in levels of success we’ve not had before.

    Or even, if it is something we know already, a twist to how to do it that would take the business to previously unforseen levels.

    Thanks

  92. I feel like the most basic but important content component that can make or break an interest is color scheme.

  93. Freebies are the best form of marketing and surprise.

  94. We’ve created videos for our site and they have been fun to make as well as a good way to put a face to the people behind our products and services.

  95. I think the me-too disease it invasive among most businesses. That’s why most businesses fail (or at least one of the reasons). Standing out among the crows means being different. Appealing to our need for something fresh, something new, something different, something that grabs us by the ear and slams our eyeballs smack dab into the middle of the medium being used to get our attention.

  96. Great advice and very simple to implement. I’m going to make a few changes to the vocab used on my site today and see what difference it makes.

  97. Hey Brendan,interesting suggestions. But i suppose that Guarantees sometimes may post without surprises, which untruly surprises may turned out to be company’s mistrust and misrepresentation, don’t they?

  98. @Rober Pendleton: not quite sure what you question is asking. Please try again. B.R.

  99. Sheeeeesh, I really need to give my comment a once-over before submitting. Replace “invasive” with “pervasive”, and “crows” with “crowd” :)

  100. We are constantly updating our site in order to increase conversion, we’ve noticed how little changes make a huge difference, remember not everyone who visits your website has a web development or seo brain so to those posters who are criticizing, I know companies with template websites who are making half a million pounds a month

  101. I think the key for conversion rates still is a clean and simple checkout procedure. But the 46 1/2 day return policy sounds interesting :)

  102. I think it’s essential to keep in mind that internet marketing is always changing and we always need to look for new and fresh techniques to keep conversions steady.

  103. Photo and video is a key item to suprise other. But when you find out your privacy is exporing all over the net that is shock!

  104. Nice insights on improving conversions. I too belive that surprises like free shipping do help in converting.

  105. I agree.. giving FREE and USEFUL stuff to your viewers is the most effective strategy of increasing conversion rates.

  106. I’m not convinced on using everyday images of people, that would probably just make me look rather unprofessional, I do agree on the videos though. What is it that makes me (and I guess others) have this double standard towards videos vs images?

  107. Markets currently employing this strategy are weight reduction, muscle building and credit recovery sites. If you are offering a discount, make it a n off number that will make customers wonder what is going on.

  108. yups, I do agree with you, the SEO rule, in any ways, be the first or be different. I am planning something for my website too, but too tough competition.

  109. A good surprise would be a website that actually works properly and is easy to use.

    Still aren’t many of them around.

  110. Great Brendan, in my opinion everything falls into the “user experience” category. If the user can navigate his way around the site and enjoy the content then he will surely be back. That being said it is important to work new elements into your marketing strategy because it’s the WOW factor that will bring in new business!

  111. The surprise I use to convert leads off my website is proactive website visitor engagement based on real time and behavioral analytics on my website; all that with a conversion rate of 20%+ of engaged visitors.

  112. @Lars: Can you help me and our readers understand what exactly your “surprise” is? You say your surprise is proactive website visitor engagement based on real time and behavioral analytics. So, are you saying that you surprise your customers with jargon? With buzzwords that don’t add up to much? Please enlighten us! Thanks.

  113. Great article, I would be also careful with using ads on your site, especially these, that are blatantly flashing n your face preventing you from seeing the site content before you close it.

  114. Surprise is good, wow is even better of course, if it all adds up in the end of course.
    However I think those small surprises as free shipping really is to common to be seen as surprises but that probably can give a push sometimes.

  115. I would also add that having sideshows are interesting presentations helps as well for presentation. You really need to build customer’s trust, so having shock is never a good thing.

  116. The element of pleasant surprise is a great way to optimize the usage of your website and to help intrigue potential clients more than simply a nice layout. As Thailand suggested, even doing small things like removing Shipping costs on a sales item or something to that effect will certainly help to bring in traffic.

  117. Great idea as long as visitors are pleasantly surprised.

    So many companies have a hard time with the “unique” part of a USP.

  118. ALAS! I love your statement about the STOCK PHOTOS for customer service. There’s such a comforting feeling to see a company’s Team members. Especially with all of the fly-by-night companies on the web today that are here today and gonzo tomorrow.

    Show me your assets, the people who make things happen. Then I’m comforted in knowing you are a legitimate business.

    Thanks again for sharing such great points, especially the stock photo one!

  119. what about the call to action button, does that come under content?

  120. @sim only: interesting question. Should we try to surprise our prospects with call to action? Remember that calls to action are elements that are hybrids of copy/labeling, user experience, and forms. UX and forms are things where you might end up with a negative “shock,” while copy is fair game for “surprise.” I would only try surprise on a call to action in terms of the copy. That might work, but if you mess with the standards of button behavior and shape, you’re definitely taking a risk.

  121. Another area where you should avoid surprises: web sites that start playing audio messages automatically. I own several consumer bankruptcy law web sites and the last thing that a potential client wants is a blaring introduction to the bankruptcy process when he is quietly researching debt relief at work.

  122. #

    The idea behind this blog post is sound, although the actual advice leaves a bit to be desired. 46.5 day guarantee? Honestly, I doubt that most people look at that.
    It’s not good idea!

  123. I like how you talked about the guarantee factors… I think we hear guarantee until we are blue in the face. I like what a young Thomas Callahan had to say about guarantees that more often than not its just a box of crap with a label of guaranteed on it and usually its just that crap!

  124. Updating regularly your website is the best boost you can give to it. Plus, refreshing incoming links always helps!

  125. Internet users get bored very easily. If it’s the same thing all the time seems there is no element of surprise. So I agree on something different is cool. I recently spoke with a company that was doing a seminar. Instead of the usual boring things that have made a video seminar for a group of people sitting around the breakfast table. cool idea and really worked!

  126. wow. a great article but can I thought shock was near enough the same as surprise.

    you’ve really enlightened me – well done :)

  127. It should be kept in mind that all online marketing efforts should be capitalised to make your online campaign work better including your PPC< SEO, Email, Affiliates Marketing, CPC and AdNetworks

  128. Great idea as long as visitors are pleasantly surprised.

    So many companies have a hard time with the “unique” part of a USP.

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